When Hope isn't Found in the Resurrection

When Hope isn't Found in the Resurrection

(Photo by Marc Boswell)

“For some, these questions are uncomfortable ones.  Like me, they were likely taught to never be angry with or to question God.  To do so was to be unfaithful, but I no longer believe that crap.  Jesus asked these very questions and experienced the same seasons of grief, fear and isolation that we all do, and yet Jesus found hope not in being delivered from evil, but in knowing that God was with him no matter what came.”

(By Rev. Bojangles Blanchard)

Who Gets to be Racist?

Who Gets to be Racist?

(Photo by Sarah Vilardo)

“Another way to approach this matter is to ask: Who gets to be racist in the white, liberal social imaginary? When white people tell ourselves stories about racism and white supremacy, what are the types and figures that we use? How do we position ourselves over against other white folks in our attempts to make meaning of the racism we run up against and/or benefit from in our society?”

(By Rev. Dr. Marc Boswell)

My Seminary has Closed...

My Seminary has Closed...

(Photo: Unsplash)

“As a pastor trained by the 20th century but living and serving in the 21st, I know the next steps for all churches will require us to bless and release much of how things have always been. To move forward with integrity, we all must dream, innovate and discern what the next, right steps are.

Those steps won’t be the same for every church or divinity school or other religious organization. Some will face the hard truth of needing to close their doors.”

(By Rev. Elizabeth Mangham Lott)

Returning...

Returning...

(Photo: Unknown)

“What I can do is bear witness to the impact that [Thich Nhat Hahn], his writings, his teachings, and his life had on me and, I suspect, other Western Christians. And while I have no idea if this was his intention…I can state, unambiguously, that his Buddhism made me a better Christian, a truth that I’d like to offer a few words to explain.”

(By Rev. Dr. James McLeod, Jr.)

Spiritual Musings on the Blues

Spiritual Musings on the Blues

(Photo: Marc Boswell)

“This is why Black theologians should not hesitate to seek the Spiritual within and reflect theologically upon all facets of cultural productions present in the Black community that are shaping the contours of Black life. This led Cone to examine the Blues as theological texts, defying the binary mentioned at the beginning of this essay in which some theologians ignore the religious depth of so-called secular texts.”

(By Rev. Dr. Darvin Adams, I)

Immigration: Myths & Facts

Immigration: Myths & Facts

(Photo: REUTERS/Mike Blake)

“Below is a list of the top ten myths and facts related to immigration in the United States. It was prepared by the National Immigration Forum. Though a bit dated, the information continues to address certain key talking points related to the topic. Consider using this as a resource in your in congregation, family, or community organizing group.“

(By Rev. Dr. Marc Boswell)

The Weight of Peace

The Weight of Peace

(Photo: Audra Melton)

“If, because my life is fine, I decide that all lives are fine, I am only a mercenary and not a citizen, out to get the spoils of this life without regard for my sisters' and brothers' welfare. Real justice leaves no one behind. Hope won't allow it.

(By Leigh Anne Armstrong)

Theological Affections

Theological Affections

(William Holbrook Beard)

“In consideration of how the Holy Spirit works in all of creation (including the Christian church and the individual believer), Anyabwile stresses the need for Black folk to study what the Bible and the early Christian tradition says about the Spirit giving life to oppressive situations. In addition to seeking guidance from the Bible, the early church fathers and mothers can teach the Black Church even more about the Spirit of God working in the mundane spaces of sacred institutions and secular environments. “

(By Rev. Dr. Darvin A. Adams, I)

A Baptist Meets the Buddha

A Baptist Meets the Buddha

(Photo credit unknown)

“Buddhist meditation, therefore, not only taught me a new way to pray, it also provided a desperately needed detour around an anthropomorphic mode of thinking about the Sacred…. To state it differently, my soul was yearning for a concept and experience of the divine that wasn’t rooted in a theology anchored by a powerful male deity who held sinners in ‘H’is hands over the pits of hell.”

(By Rev. Dr. Marc Boswell)

Prayer for After a Person Comes Out

Prayer for After a Person Comes Out

(Photo Credit Unknown)

“Like Lazarus being called out of the tomb, or Mary Magdalene whose eyes were opened to the resurrected Christ upon hearing her name, we know you have called ___’s name and claimed them as your own. When things get difficult, remind ___ of this community who loves them and has promised to walk through life with them.”

(By Jess Cook, M.Div.)

A Migrant Caravan

A Migrant Caravan

(John Moore/Getty Images)

“Our sacred story tells us of mothers and fathers who grab their babies and children and whatever they can carry on their back because the food has run out and there are no more jobs and people actively want to kill them. Our sacred story tells us to care for and welcome and embrace these people who are fleeing.”

(By Rev. Elizabeth Mangham Lott)

In-Between Patriotism

In-Between Patriotism

(iStockPhoto)

“Today, it's hard to recapture this spirit of optimism, the trust we once placed in our political institutions. In many respects, the American project is suffering a crisis of confidence. Thus, it's almost a truism to state that the confidence we had in our political institutions to "do the right thing" has been severely eroded.”

(By Dr. Jonathan Best)

The People We Don't Care About

The People We Don't Care About

(Photo by Walter Bennett)

“Today, the forgotten folks of Appalachia, the rural South, the formerly industrial midwest, need a greater voice to speak for them just as the addicted across the country need folks to move beyond sympathy and towards honest to God care and concern.”

(By Rev. Dr. James McLeod, Jr.)

Nothing Less...

Nothing Less...

(Ancient Icon)

“Though there have been significant gains in the thirty years since that first National Coming Out Day, the world is in many ways still unsafe for LGBTQIA+ people, and too many people still risk losing their families, jobs, homes, or their lives if they come out.”

(By Jess Cook, M.Div.)

Who is it For?

Who is it For?

(Photo credit unknown)

“Why am I such a verbal curmudgeon when confronted with a grand gesture of generosity? Why am I so critical, indeed?  Is it the what people do for others in crisis moments that so unsettles me, or the when or the why? Or the who?”

(By Rev. Dr. Ellen Richardson)